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Per Persson. Photo.

Per Persson

Director

Per Persson. Photo.

Chemical changes in organic matter after fungal colonization in a nitrogen fertilized and unfertilized Norway spruce forest

Author

  • César Nicolás
  • Juan P. Almeida
  • Magnus Ellström
  • Adam Bahr
  • Sharon E. Bone
  • Nicholas P. Rosenstock
  • John R. Bargar
  • Anders Tunlid
  • Per Persson
  • Håkan Wallander

Summary, in English

Background and aims: Decomposition and transformation of organic matter (OM) in forest soils are conducted by the concomitant action of saprotrophic and mycorrhizal fungi. Here, we examine chemical changes in OM after fungal colonization in nitrogen fertilized and unfertilized soils from a Norway spruce forest. Methods: Sand-filled bags amended with composted maize leaves were placed in the forest soil and harvested after 17 months. Infrared and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopies were used to study the chemical changes in the OM. Fungal community composition of the bags was also evaluated. Results: The proportion of ectomycorrhizal fungi declined in the fertilized plots, but the overall fungal community composition was similar between N treatments. Decomposition of the OM was, independently of the N level or soil horizon, accompanied by an increase of C/N ratio of the mesh-bag content. Moreover, the proportions of carboxylic compounds in the incubated OM increased in the mineral horizon, while heterocyclic-N compounds decreased, especially in unfertilized plots with higher N demand from the trees. Conclusions: Our results indicate that more oxidized organic C and less heterocyclic-N proportions in the OM remain after fungal colonization in the mineral layers, and suggest that ectomycorrhizal fungi transfer less heterocyclic-N from the mesh bags to the host trees under high N levels.

Department/s

  • MEMEG
  • Microbial Ecology
  • Biodiversity
  • Centre for Environmental and Climate Science (CEC)
  • BECC - Biodiversity and Ecosystem services in a Changing Climate

Publishing year

2017-10

Language

English

Pages

113-126

Publication/Series

Plant and Soil

Volume

419

Issue

1-2

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

Springer

Topic

  • Microbiology
  • Ecology

Keywords

  • Fungal community composition
  • Infrared spectroscopy
  • Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy
  • Nitrogen fertilization
  • Norway spruce forest
  • Organic matter decomposition

Status

Published

Project

  • MICCS - Molecular Interactions Controlling soil Carbon Sequestration

Research group

  • Microbial Ecology

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 0032-079X