Your browser has javascript turned off or blocked. This will lead to some parts of our website to not work properly or at all. Turn on javascript for best performance.

The browser you are using is not supported by this website. All versions of Internet Explorer are no longer supported, either by us or Microsoft (read more here: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/microsoft-365/windows/end-of-ie-support).

Please use a modern browser to fully experience our website, such as the newest versions of Edge, Chrome, Firefox or Safari etc.

Per Persson. Photo.

Per Persson

Director

Per Persson. Photo.

Mineral surface-reactive metabolites secreted during fungal decomposition contribute to the formation of soil organic matter

Author

  • Tao Wang
  • Zhaomo Tian
  • Per Bengtson
  • Anders Tunlid
  • Per Persson

Summary, in English

Soil organic matter (SOM) constitutes the largest terrestrial C pool. An emerging, untested, view is that oxidation and depolymerization of SOM by microorganisms promote the formation of SOM-mineral associations that is critical for SOM stabilization. To test this hypothesis, we performed laboratory-scale experiments involving one ectomycorrhizal and one saprotrophic fungus that represent the two major functional groups of microbial decomposers in the boreal forest soils. Fungal decomposition enhanced the retention of SOM on goethite, partly because of oxidative modifications of organic matter (OM) by the fungi. Moreover, both fungi secreted substantial amounts (> 10% new biomass C) of aromatic metabolites that also contributed to an enhanced mineral retention of OM. Our study demonstrates that soil fungi can form mineral-stabilized SOM not only by oxidative conversion of the SOM but also by synthesizing mineral surface-reactive metabolites. Metabolites produced by fungal decomposers can play a yet overlooked role in the formation and stabilization of SOM.

Department/s

  • MEMEG
  • Centre for Environmental and Climate Science (CEC)
  • BECC - Biodiversity and Ecosystem services in a Changing Climate
  • Microbial Ecology

Publishing year

2017-12-01

Language

English

Pages

5117-5129

Publication/Series

Environmental Microbiology

Volume

19

Issue

12

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

Wiley-Blackwell

Topic

  • Microbiology

Status

Published

Project

  • MICCS - Molecular Interactions Controlling soil Carbon Sequestration

Research group

  • Microbial Ecology

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 1462-2912